10 Adventurous Tourist Attractions in China

10 Adventurous Tourist Attractions in China

The last post I wrote was called 101 Travel Experiences in China. Excited to share all of the experiences I had in China, both good and bad, I poured weeks worth of work into that post. But nobody read it. It was just too long. Plus, I made the mistake of putting in tourist attractions in China that were not worth doing. People don’t care about those – they just want to know what to do… not what not to do. So being the industrious fellow that I am, I condensed my 10,000 word behemoth to only those experiences that were truly adventurous (this is, after all, an adventure travel blog). They are the Best of the Best; the Eric Roberts of travel experiences if you will. So please enjoy. 1) Walk the Plank Road in the Sky on Mount Hua Located a short day trip outside of Xian, Mount Hua is one of the five sacred mountains of China and has a long history of religious and historical significance. Reaching the northern summit takes approximately 5 hours and requires ascending a series of steep stone staircases (like most mountains in China). Mount Hua’s crags and spines make for a beautiful, all be it, precipitous trek. So much so, that its been labeled the world’s most dangerous hike. Probably the most infamous of all the attractions is the Plank Road in the sky, located on Mount Hua’s south Peak. Fifty meters of wood precariously nailed to the side of a cliff takes you on a stroll 1000 meters above a spiky mountain range below. I was scared shitless before doing it, but I found that once I got there, it wasn’t nearly as bad...
101 Travel Experiences in China

101 Travel Experiences in China

Author’s Note: Recently, I spent 40 days traveling through China. I traveled mostly by train and hiked as often as I could, mostly on China’s five sacred mountains. In this post, I share with you both my positive and negative travel experiences. I took most of the photos – the exception being in the Potpourri section and a few other sporadic experiences. Thanks for reading and I hope you find this post a valuable resource for planning your journey through China. p.s. That’s a picture of me gagging on the gelatinous skin of an unidentified, fried...
How to eat Scorpion in Beijing

How to eat Scorpion in Beijing

In the heart of Beijing, off the side of one of its busiest streets, lies a peculiar market. It’s where tourists go to test the saying that the Chinese will eat anything with four legs and isn’t a table. Actually, the saying shouldn’t be restricted to only four legs, really anything that lives and breathes is a potential food for the Chinese. Flying lizards, beetles, grasshoppers, snakes, scorpions, organs of cow, pig and chicken – the Chinese are not restricted to one Phylum let alone one Class of food. I have my eye on a row of black scorpions. The street vendor notices immediately and begins his pitch. “Scorpion good. Taste like Chicken. You try. Come.” I am still a bit nervous from a run in twenty minutes earlier I had with a snake. It had a slimy, gelatinous texture and even the four scoops of chill sauce dumped on top couldn’t suppress an overtly reptilian taste; something like fish that had gone rotten. Part of the problem was that I couldn’t seem to locate any actual meat, just the scaly, translucent skin. I ate two bites and chucked it in the trash-bin. “Come, come. You try.” He diverts my attention away from the huge black scorpions, to the smaller, brownish variety. The scorpions are skewered on small wooden dowels and displayed in rows. The wiggles of tails and clamping of claws prove their freshness to connoisseurs of scorpion in Beijing, before they are unceremoniously fried. I am no connoisseur, just a tourist with a peaked interest. On my first day in China, I posted on Facebook that I was starting with...